Blog

During, before, and after the field course, Polaris students and faculty share their thoughts through journal entries.

© Chris Linder

Blog Posts

  • Yakutsk, Eastern Siberian city of mammoth bones, permafrost, cultural diversity, and lattes!

    Greeting from eastern Siberia.  My name is Sudeep Chandra, one of the principal investigators on the Polaris Project and an assistant professor at the University of Nevada- Reno. Our trip to date has been filled with learning experiences for all involved.…
  • Home – NY – Moscow – Yakutsk… Cherskiy Tomorrow!

    We are now several days into our trip and we’ll finally reach Cherskiy, our final destination, tomorrow (if all goes as planned).  Things have gone mostly smoothly so far, with one notable exception.  One of the undergraduate students had a health issue (sinus infection) that was quite severe when we were in Moscow, and after several agonizing hours of discussion we decided that we couldn’t take the chance of her condition worsening as we headed to our remote field site in the Siberian Arctic. …
  • Comments

    The ‘Comments’ on the blogs have been set up to work correctly now. Readers feel free to comment. I’ll have to approve them but will try to do so regularly. So make yourself heard! -Andy, WWU Professor and reluctant blogmaster.…
  • Здравствуите из Якутска!

    We arrived in Yakutsk around 10 am yesterday due to a plane delay in Moscow.  While the flight was technically a “red-eye”, it never was dark during its 6 hour duration.  In order to retrieve our baggage, a ticket had to be shown for each bag (a system drastically different from the United States). …
  • Thoughts from the Moscow airport

    July 7th, 2008 From the Moscow airport We have been traveling for a long time now and are waiting for, in some cases, our third red-eye in four days, as others have already mentioned.  We have used this time to get to know each other and to begin what will be an ongoing conversation about Arctic science. …
  • ресторан москва кафе стоп банк россна

    We arrived into Moscow early around 10:00 a.m. planning on spending several hours going through customs and ended up passing right through. Arriving at our ‘hotel’ nicknamed the Green Circle Hilton which was really a dormitory resembling a prison/hospital. There was a dog in the lobby.…
  • Moscow

    We arrived in Moscow at dawn on July six. We made it through customs in a fairly short amount of time with all our scientific gear intact. Everybody was feeling pretty ragged as Kate Bulygina met the two minibuses she had hired and we loaded all the gear into one and all the people into the other.…
  • Leg one completed

    Tyler, Holly and I finished the first of our three overnight flights after landing at JFK at 7:00AM from Seattle. We met up with the St. Olaf crew fresh off field work in California and are trying get some rest before meeting the rest of the crew at the gate to catch our flight to Moscow.…
  • Just about ready..

    So I think I’m pretty packed and ready! More than anything I’m excited to finally begin this experience! It finally hit me that I’m GOING TO SIBERIA tomorrow morning!  How many people get to say that? Packing was somewhat difficult, it being hard to pack ‘light’ for a 3-week trip into western Siberia but I think I’m just under the limit! …
  • Packing, preparing, etc.

    So the past few days have been spent getting together all of the unfamiliar equipment I’ve acquired this summer and trying to fit them into one duffel bag. Unsuccessfully. But what has been really enjoyable has been responding to the question “What are you up to this summer?” I think that going to Siberia is the last response anyone I’ve spoken to has expected to hear.…
  • Ready to Go!

    After several months of work, on March 16, 2007, we submitted our Polaris Project proposal to the National Science Foundation’s International Polar Year grant competition.  Six months later we learned that our proposal was successful – the project would actually happen. …
  • Max and Anya on the radio…

    Max and Russian student Anya Suslova did an interview on public radio about the Student Partners Project. They give a great interview and talk about the Polaris Project a bit at the end. Listen here. You’ll learn something about rivers in the Arctic and something about how the Polaris Project got started.…
  • The Sea Ice Pool

    Betting on future climate has become a phenomenon on lately. See here and here, and here. (Those are all blogs I like by the way). In a related vein, there is also a pool for bets on what the minimum arctic sea ice extent will be in 2008.…
  • Max’s Update from Yakutsk, Siberia

    As part of another NSF funded project, I’m in Russia for ~3 weeks with a group of four people.  Two have never been to Russia before, so in some ways it is a good test run to help identify some of the logistical challenges we’ll face moving the Polaris Project group from the US to Moscow to Yakutsk to Cherskiy.  …
  • Frey to conduct fieldwork in the northern Bering Sea on the Coast Guard Cutter Healy icebreaker

    In addition to having research interests in impacts of permafrost thaw on land-ocean linkages of carbon and nutrients in Siberia, my research also investigates carbon dynamics in coastal and shelf environments in the Arctic. My most recent project seeks to determine impacts of sea ice variability and polynya formation on biological productivity and spring phytoplankton blooms in the northern Bering Sea.…
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